Children are very precious to God, yet they are often the hardest hit by poverty.

Poverty is often defined as living on less than $2 per day.

But poverty is complex.

Children are very precious to God, yet they are often the hardest hit by poverty.

Poverty is often defined as living on less than $2 per day.

But poverty is complex.

Poverty can stop a child from going to school. From receiving health care. From accessing clean water and nutritional food.

Because of these issues, millions of children worldwide suffer shame, hopelessness and may not survive to adulthood. 

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Child issues.

  • Child Poverty

    Child Poverty

    Poverty is more than just a lack of money.

    It’s not being able to go to school, battling poor health, social stigma and feelings of isolation, shame and worthlessness.

    It is the result of broken relationships, first with God, then with others and finally with oneself. It can make people feel inferior and powerless.

    It's estimated that around 400 million children live in poverty.

    Source: Millennium Development Goals Report 2013, World Bank 2013

    Poverty is more than just a lack of money.

    It’s not being able to go to school, battling poor health, social stigma and feelings of isolation, shame and worthlessness.

    It is the result of broken relationships, first with God, then with others and finally with oneself. It can make people feel inferior and powerless.

    It's estimated that around 400 million children live in poverty.

    Source: Millennium Development Goals Report 2013, World Bank 2013

     
  • Child Education

    Child Education

    Between 2000 and 2011, the number of children not attending school declined from 102 million to 57 million. 

    However, this progress is not enough.

    Children from poor households often can’t afford to go to school. They can be homeless, orphaned, or need to work to help support their families. Sometimes parents cannot afford school fees, uniforms or books. 

    Source: Millennium Development Goals Report 2013

    Between 2000 and 2011, the number of children not attending school declined from 102 million to 57 million. 

    However, this progress is not enough.

    Children from poor households often can’t afford to go to school. They can be homeless, orphaned, or need to work to help support their families. Sometimes parents cannot afford school fees, uniforms or books. 

    Source: Millennium Development Goals Report 2013

     
  • Child Mortality

    Child Mortality

    19,000 children under five die every day from causes that are mostly preventable.

    More progress is needed to give children the best chance at life. 

    The global mortality rate for children under five is estimated to be 51 deaths per 1000 live births.

    In sub-Saharan Africa, one in nine children die before age five, more than 16 times the average for developed regions.
    Child deaths most often occur in the poorest regions, and in the first month of life.

    Source: Millennium Development Goals Report 2013

    19,000 children under five die every day from causes that are mostly preventable.

    More progress is needed to give children the best chance at life. 

    The global mortality rate for children under five is estimated to be 51 deaths per 1000 live births.

    In sub-Saharan Africa, one in nine children die before age five, more than 16 times the average for developed regions.
    Child deaths most often occur in the poorest regions, and in the first month of life.

    Source: Millennium Development Goals Report 2013

     
  • Child Health

    Child Health

    Nearly one in six children worldwide, under age five, is underweight. One in four has stunted growth.

    So much more needs to be done.

    Even before a child is born their health could be at risk. Parents may struggle to pay for their child’s health care, vaccinations, medication and transport to the hospital, meaning preventable illnesses go unchecked. This means damage to a child’s health occurs during the most crucial time of development.

    Source: Millennium Development Goals Report 2013

    Nearly one in six children worldwide, under age five, is underweight. One in four has stunted growth.

    So much more needs to be done.

    Even before a child is born their health could be at risk. Parents may struggle to pay for their child’s health care, vaccinations, medication and transport to the hospital, meaning preventable illnesses go unchecked. This means damage to a child’s health occurs during the most crucial time of development.

    Source: Millennium Development Goals Report 2013

     
Erika, Ecuador.

Erika, Ecuador.

Erika was just 14 years old when she fell pregnant with Alexa. Friends encouraged Erika to abort her baby, but she refused.

When Alexa was born, her small body was severely malnourished and the doctors said she was unlikely to survive. But with help from doctors and the Child Survival Program in Ecuador, Alexa fought for her life and Erika learned how to care for her newborn. “If it weren’t for the Child Survival Program, my daughter would have died,” says Erika.

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Gideon, Ghana.

Gideon, Ghana.

In Gideon’s community in Ghana, the average family earns the equivalent of AU$5.00 a week. Putting food on the table is a daily struggle. Out of desperation, people often turn to drugs, prostitution and child labour to make ends meet.

Gideon’s parents run a small business selling waakye, a rice and beans mixture, to support their family of six. They don’t earn much, so Compassion’s support is invaluable. This year, because of Gideon’s sponsor, they could afford to enrol their children in school and take them for regular health checkups.

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Samuel, Ghana.

Samuel, Ghana.

When Samuel started complaining of knee pain, his parents feared for his life. They had already lost three sons to the same illness. Each time, their sons had looked perfectly healthy right up until the leg pains started. They hadn’t been able to afford medical care then.

But this time, there was hope. Samuel was sponsored through Compassion, who took him to the doctors. He was diagnosed with haemophilia, an inherited blood disorder. Through Critical Interventions, Samuel now receives medical treatments three times a week and is doing well.

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