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Education is a powerful way to defeat poverty.

Every sponsored child will go to school. But breaking the cycle of poverty often requires more than lessons.

Many children need extra educational support to thrive at school, and beyond. This could be tutoring, computer labs, or resource centres. Textbooks, vocational training, or university education. By meeting these vital needs, Compassion helps children to learn for life.


Please give today to invest in a child's future.


Donations over $2 are tax deductible.


Thank you for giving children the support and resources they need to reach their God-given potential!

Why Education?

Having left school without the skills they need, over a quarter of the world’s young people are trapped in jobs that keep them on or below the poverty line.

The reasons are varied and many.

Overcrowded classrooms.
Impractical curriculums.
A lack of resources.

But Compassion staff know each child’s strengths and struggles. They understand children’s specific education needs—and how meeting those needs can help them triumph over poverty.

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    • Let's find out more...

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    • So, how is Compassion helping?

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    • What can you do?

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      The person he loved most was gone.

      When Sameson was three years old, his mother had taken him to his aunt's home, kissed him goodbye, and left. She was too ill to care for him, but Sameson was too young to understand this.

      All he knew was that the person he loved most was gone.

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      In the lonely, confusing weeks that followed,

      Sameson quickly learnt the unspoken rule of his new home: everyone worked for survival, even the smallest and the youngest.

      This meant if his cousins didn't come to take over Sameson's job of herding the cattle and sheep, Sameson couldn't go to school.

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      He was seven years old when his life changed.

      Sameson was sponsored by Compassion. "I felt like I had gone from one world to another," says Sameson.

      For the first time in his life, Sameson had the chance to make friends, attend school regularly, and simply be a kid. His time at the Compassion centre was so different from his family’s daily struggles that Sameson wasn't sure it was real. For months, he was secretly terrified it would be taken from him.

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      "I was afraid that I would go back to being alone in the cattle field,” he says.

      The best part of sponsorship for Sameson was the encouragement he received from loving staff members.

      "[Compassion] counselled me and invested a lot in me to make me realise that I am capable of becoming whatever I want to be," he says.

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      But as Sameson grew, so too did the financial pressures on his family.

      By the time he was in high school, Sameson was juggling his schoolwork with long hours spent in the small woodshop his family ran out of their compound. It was the only way to put food on the table.

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      "I had no option but to work while my friends spent their afternoon in the library working hard," says Sameson.

      Though he tried his best at school, Sameson's worst fears were realised when he received his final Grade 10 exam result. He'd failed.

      The accusing red number was more than a bad score - it shattered his dream of studying at university.

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      Failing meant Sameson's schooling was over - passing is a requirement for further studies in Ethiopia. Unable to afford vocational training, Sameson's future looked increasingly bleak.

      But God had a different plan for his life.

      Knowing the teenager had a talent at woodwork, Compassion enrolled Sameson in a two-year carpentry course. Sameson couldn't believe it.

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      "When I heard that failing my exam was not the end of the road for me, I praised God and I was very thankful to Compassion," says Sameson.

      "For so many children in my village, failing 10th grade is the end of the road, since most can’t afford vocational school. But God gave me a second chance through Compassion."

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      It's not the future Sameson once envisioned - it's even better.

      Today, Sameson stands in his own workshop, his two employees beside him, as a dozen eager faces stare back at them.

      Alongside his successful carpentry business, Sameson teaches children in Compassion’s program, equipping them with skills for the future.

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      "My future dream, God willing, is to continue to work in this woodshop and to be able to [help] more children," says Sameson.

      There are thousands of children and young adults like Sameson. You can give them hope for a brighter future.

      Please give today to invest in a child’s future.

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Please give today to invest in a child's future.


Donations over $2 are tax deductible.


FAQs

  • Will my donation to the Education Appeal go to my sponsored child?

    No, all funds raised through the Education Appeal will be used for the most urgent education needs of Compassion assisted children around the world through Compassion's Critical Interventions.

  • Can I give educational resources directly to my sponsored child through the Education Appeal?

    No, all funds raised through the Education Appeal will be used for the most urgent education needs of Compassion assisted children around the world through Compassion's Critical Interventions.

    To give directly to your sponsored child, you can send a monetary gift. Find out more about giving gifts.

  • Why is the Education Appeal focused on education when sponsorship already helps kids receive an education?

    While every child in Compassion's program has the opportunity to go school and receive an education, many children need extra educational support to help them succeed and reach their God-given potential. The money raised through the Education Appeal will go towards providing this extra educational support, including specific training equipment and programs, building resource centres and library rooms, tutoring, meeting higher education costs and more.

  • Why doesn't Compassion provide the families with extra support so children don't have to work?

    Compassion actively encourages children in the Child Sponsorship Program to continue their school education for as long as possible. Where possible, Compassion child development centre staff seek opportunities to provide additional educational support—like tutoring or vocational training—to children to help them succeed and reach their God-given potential. Local workers, who build relationships with registered children and their families, work hard to encourage children to go to school and provide the support they need to help them avoid child labour.

    Through Compassion's Critical Interventions, many parents and guardians of registered children participate in skills training, literacy and numeracy programs and more in an effort to improve their circumstances and to provide for their children's needs. One intended outcome of these types of extra programs and support is to allow children the freedom to continue to go to school without the burden of being forced to work to contribute to the family income.

    As a sponsor, you are also able to send a family gift to the family of your sponsored child. 100 per cent of your gift amount will be used to help meet the family's greatest needs.

  • What's Compassion's stance on child marriage?

    Compassion takes a holistic approach to child development to release children from all types of poverty: spiritual, economic, social, physical and emotional. Some children in Compassion's program are faced with issues such as child marriage. When this happens, our local church partners address these issues. They are careful to do so in a sensitive and careful manner so that the safety and wellbeing of the child is the utmost priority. Where possible, legal advice is also sought.

  • Why do some children have access to computers and others don't?

    Compassion child development centres understand the educational challenges and needs of their communities and they tailor their education programs to meet the individual needs of children.

    In some communities, particular educational resources might not be effective in meeting these needs. For example, some communities don't have access to electricity, so computers wouldn't be an appropriate resource for the children. Instead these children might benefit more from a library, tutoring or vocational training.

  • How does Compassion choose who gets to go to university?

    One of the aims of Compassion's Child Sponsorship Program is for children to gain skills to become economically self-supporting adults. Compassion recognises each child is unique in their abilities, interests and dreams for the future so local child development centre staff work with children to plan for their future careers. For some, this will be seeking a university education whereas others will be undertaking an apprenticeship in a trade or entrepreneurial training and skills workshops.

  • What is Compassion's stance on keeping children in school?

    Achieving even basic educational outcomes can be a challenge in many developing countries. Although primary education is free in many of the countries Compassion works in, many parents are unable to send their children to school because they cannot afford the associated costs of uniforms, school supplies, shoes and transport.

    As a result, some children only start school for the first time between the ages of four and nine, after they are registered with the Child Sponsorship Program.

    A shortage of teachers, who are often poorly trained, overcrowded classrooms, and a lack of educational resources can also make learning difficult.

    But we know that education has great benefits in the lives of children; every year of completed schooling gives students greater skills and confidence. The opportunity to go to school, to learn and grow in a safe environment, is critically important to healthy development.

    For these reasons, Compassion considers completion of primary school to be the minimum standard required for children graduating from the Child Sponsorship Program, although we actively encourage children in our programs to continue their school education for as long as possible.